Current

National GP Supervisor Curriculum Project

Title: Developing a national GP Supervisor professional development curriculum
EV Team: Dr Julie Willems (CI), Prof Neil Spike, Dr Gerard Ingham, Dr Elisabeth Wearne, Dr Lisa Vandenburg, Dr Tim Clement
University Partners: Dr Caroline Johnson
Timeframe: January 2020 – March 2021
Funding: Educational Research Grant , Royal Australian College of Practitioners; $180,000 ($149,999.00 + $30,000 extension funding)

The national GP Supervisor Curriculum Project is funded by an RACGP Education Research Grant (ERG) to explore and develop a national curriculum for GP Supervisors. The aims of this project are to develop a national curriculum for GP-supervisors in Australia and produce a framework for its implementation. Work underway includes an analysis of focus groups of expert advisors, the one-to-one interviews of RTO and other organisational representatives, and the collection and curation of national resources to feed into the creation of the national curriculum. The completion date for this EV-led project is 31 March 2021.

National GP Supervisor Framework Project

Title: Supervisor Professional Development Framework
EV Team: Prof Neil Spike (CI), Dr Julie Willems, Dr Elisabeth Wearne, Dr Lisa Vandenburg, Dr Tim Clement
Partner RTO Applicant Murray City Country Coast (MCCC): Dr Gerard Ingham, Dr Duncan Howard
University Partners: Dr Caroline Johnson
Timeframe: January 2020 – March 2021
Funding: Special Research Grant , Royal Australian College of Practitioners; $199,915

Funded by an RACGP special grant, the purpose of the national GP Supervisor Framework Project extends the focus of the Curriculum Project to encompass the needs of all GP Supervisors from non AGPT pathways. As such, the aims incorporate GP supervisors in the AGPT program and extend it to other training pathways and workforce programs. The project will identify and elaborate the challenges and enablers of implementing the curriculum and will provide guidance to support its appropriate implementation. The completion date for this EV-led project is 31 March 2021.

Cultural Safety Project

Title: Cultural safety and GP Supervisor continuing professional development at Eastern Victoria GP Training
EV Team: A.Prof Marlene Drysdale, Dr Julie Willems (CI), A.Prof Janice Chesters (CI), Dr Liz Wearne, Nicole Cassar, Jo Anne Rash, Stephanie Samargis
Timeframe: July 2020 – December 2021
Funding: DoH Strategic Plan Special Projects; $285,506.00

Funded by the Department of Health’s Strategic Plan Special Project’s grant, this EV led research has several key phases. The first phase (through to December 2020) is to develop a Cultural Safety Framework for EV through a range of data collection methods including an Audit within EV. Building on this, the second phase involves building Cultural Safety modules for Supervisor PD (both face-to-face and online); related to this is the final phase pf module evaluation and reporting. As public funding, the EV Cultural Safety Framework and Supervisor PD modules will be available as open source to other RTOs and organisations. The completion date for this project is end 2021.

Past

Role of feedback in progression to independent practice

Title: From trainee to GP: the role of feedback in promoting progression to independent practice
EV Team: Dr Cat Kirby, Dr James Brown, Dr Aloechka Delamaine, Dr Belinda Garth, Dr Elisabeth Wearne
University Partners:
  • A/Prof Margaret Bearman, Dr Mary Dracup, A/Prof Rola Ajjawi (Centre for Research in Assessment and Digital Learning (CRADLE), Deakin University)
  • Dr John Furler, Dr Caroline Johnson (Faculty of Medicine, Dentistry and Health Sciences, University of Melbourne)
Timeframe: July 2018 – July 2019
Funding: Educational Research Grant, Royal Australian College of General Practitioners, $149, 928

 

Project summary:
The goal of this project was to explore the role of feedback and performance relevant information (PRI) in supporting GP registrars to practice without supervision. The overarching research question was: How do newly qualified GP fellows narrate how feedback assists or detracts in overcoming complex performance challenges across the registrar training lifecycle? The research team gathered qualitative data using semi-structured one-on-one interviews with 16 recently fellowed GPs. Based on preliminary findings, focus groups were conducted with 10 supervisors and medical educators, providing important alternate perspectives to the interview data.

Educational alliance project

Title: Feedback exchanges, supervisory relationships and the educational alliance: implications for GP registrar and supervisor training and support
EV Team: Dr Cat Kirby, Dr Belinda Garth, Dr Bianca Denny, Adj. Prof. Janice Chesters, Dr James Brown, Jenny Lamb
University Partners: Dr Rola Ajjawi and Associate Professor Margaret Bearman
Centre for Research in Assessment and Digital Learning (CRADLE), Deakin University
Professor Debra Nestel
Faculty of Medicine Nursing & Health Science, Monash University
Timeframe: August 2017 – August 2018
Funding: Educational Research Grant, Royal Australian College of General Practitioners, $150,420

Project summary:
Establishing and maintaining open, effective feedback dialogues between GP supervisor and registrar is critical for learning but often challenging for both parties. The ‘educational alliance’ framework suggests that the overall supervisory relationship can affect learners’ attitudes to feedback long before a feedback exchange takes place. Our goal is to extend current thinking about feedback exchanges between supervisor and registrar, and how it may be better understood and facilitated through the educational alliance framework. Findings from this research have the capacity to inform how EV and the broader GP training community provides professional development and support for supervisors and registrars to build reciprocal, dialogic and effective supervisory relationships. The research will utilise audio recordings of open two-way feedback sessions between 10 pairs of GP supervisors and GPT2 registrars in Term 2 of 2017, copies of written feedback between the pairs, and follow-up semi-structured interviews 3 to 4 weeks following the feedback sessions.

GP Supervisor Identity project

Title: GP supervisors as clinicians and educators: Developing and maintaining multiple professional identities
EV Team: Dr Belinda Garth, Dr Cat Kirby, Dr James Brown
University Partners: Professor Debra Nestel
Faculty of Medicine Nursing & Health Science, Monash University
Timeframe: January 2017 – January 2018
Funding: Educational Research Grant, Australian College of Rural and Remote Medicine, $106,827

Project summary:
Being a GP supervisor involves an expansion of a GP’s professional identity to accommodate the roles of educator; including teacher, collaborative life-long learner, coach and role model. Within these roles, supervisors must negotiate multiple duties of care; to themselves, their patients, their registrar, and a broader responsibility to the medical profession. There is very little empirical research and literature pertaining to GP supervisors, particularly as it relates to developing and maintaining multiple professional identities.

The primary goal of this project is to explore the experiences of GP supervisors at different stages of supervisor professional development so that training programs can provide appropriate and effective support. This project will focus on identifying specific factors that facilitate or impede professional identity formation and the management of multiple roles, to enhance supervisor training, support and retention.
The methods include semi-structured interviews with 15 GP supervisors from three cohorts:

  • New GP supervisors with 12 months’ experience
  • Supervisors with 3-5 years’ experience
  • Supervisors with 20+ years’ experience

Review of Australian and International Models of GP Vocational Training and Education

Title: Review of Australian and International Models of GP Vocational Training and Education
EV Team: Dr Cat Kirby, Dr James Brown, Dr Merryn Smith, , Ms Jenny Lamb
RTO Partners: MCCC
University Partners: Dr David Snadden, University of British Columbia
Dr Susan Wearne, Australian Department of Health and Australian National University
Timeframe: July 2017 – July 2018
Funding: EV GP Training and MCCC

Project summary:
This research is examining Australian and international models of GP training and education, the ways in which the models are delivered, and the evidence and theory underpinning these approaches. This project aims to:

  • Contribute to the scholarship on best-practice in GP vocational education.
  • Inform the delivery and future development of GP vocational training in Australia
  • Build networks for sharing information between stakeholders in national and international delivery of GP vocational training

The project is utilising semi-structured interviews with key national and international stakeholders in GP training and education, a review of publicly available documents, and literature reviews examining evidence for best practice delivery of GP vocational training and education, and the use of educational theory in this field.

New GP Supervisor project

Title: From clinician to educator: GP supervisor professional identity formation and the implications for training
EV Team: Dr Belinda Garth, Dr Cat Kirby, Dr James Brown
University Partners: Professor Debra Nestel
Faculty of Medicine Nursing & Health Science, Monash University
Timeframe: January 2016 – January 2017
Funding: Educational Research Grant, Department of Health, Australia, $149,996

Project summary:
GPs who become supervisors undergo a professional role transition that involves development of a new “educator” identity. The primary goal of this project is to deepen our understanding of the early stages of GP supervisors’ professional development so that training programs can effectively support new supervisors during their development. This project focused on identifying specific points, events and factors that facilitated or impeded professional development. Although there is literature on role transition and professional identity formation among medical students, there is very little empirical research and literature pertaining to GP supervisors.

The methods included:

  • Exploratory multiple-case study design
  • The unit of analysis is the individual supervisor and includes:
    • Round 1 interview at the start of Semester 1.
    • Weekly audio diary reflections throughout the semester.
    • Round 2 interview at the end of Semester 1.
  • Two focus groups with new GP supervisors (held at supervisor workshops in February and May 2016).

Learning Plans project

Title: Learning planning in GP vocational training. How do registrars identify, plan and pursue learning goals, and what is the value of mandated learning planners to this process?
EV Team: Dr Cat Kirby, Dr Belinda Garth, Dr James Brown
RTO Partners: Dr Peter Silberberg, North Coast General Practice Training
Dr Chris Harnden & Dr Tamsin Cockayne, Northern Territory GP Education
University Partners: Professor Leon Piterman, Monash University
Timeframe: July 2014 – August 2015
Funding: Educational Research Grant, Department of Health, Australia, $254,794

 

Project summary:
Learning plans are a familiar and requisite activity for those engaged in Australian general practice training. Mandated by the Royal Australian College of General Practitioners (RACGP) and the Australian College of Rural and Remote Medicine (ACRRM), learning plans have been embedded in GP training since the 1980’s, forming part of the credentialing process to assess registrar competence. This research aimed to examine how Australian General Practice Training (AGPT) registrars identify and address their learning needs, the utility of formal RTP learning plans in this process, and whether there are more effective ways to support registrar learning planning.

The research utilised a mixed methods design to collect data across parts of rural Victoria, rural New South Wales and the Northern Territory:

  • In-depth semi-structured focus groups with 35 AGPT registrars, 16 GP supervisors and 17 medical educators (MEs).
  • One-on-one semi-structured interviews with 12 recently-fellowed GPs.
  • A self-report log of 27 AGPT registrars’ learning activities over a two week period.
  • Retrospective learning plan usage data based on learning plans from three Regional Training Providers (RTPs).
  • Delphi technique to develop a best practice consensus statement on learning plan use.